Hispanic Heritage Month

Discover a collection of books that celebrate and recognize the contributions of Hispanic Americans to the history, culture, and achievements of the United States.

Books for Adults

You Sound Like a White Girl: The Case for Rejecting Assimilation

by Arce, Julissa

In this dual polemic and manifesto, Julissa dives into and tears apart the lie that assimilation leads to belonging. She combs through history and her own story to break down this myth, arguing that assimilation is a moving finish line designed to keep Black and brown Americans and immigrants chasing racist American ideals. She talks about the Lie of Success, the Lie of Legality, the Lie of Whiteness, and the Lie of English—each promising that if you obtain these things, you will reach acceptance and won’t be an outsider anymore. Julissa deftly argues that these demands leave her and those like her in a purgatory—neither able to secure the power and belonging within whiteness nor find it in the community and cultures whiteness demands immigrants and people of color leave behind.

App Kid: Como un Hijo de Inmigrantes Consiguio un Pedazo del Sueno Americano

by Sayman, Michael

Emprendedor por naturaleza e hijo de inmigrantes hispanos, Michael luchó desde niño por encontrar su lugar en el mundo. En App Kid, nos cuenta cómo, a raíz del colapso del negocio familiar que llevaban sus padres, aprendió a programar por sí mismo, lanzando una aplicación para iPhone que llegó a recaudar miles de dólares al mes, lo suficiente para mantener a flote a su familia. Entrado en la adolescencia, nos comparte la increíble experiencia que vivió al pasar de la escuela secundaria directamente al mundo profesional, entrando a trabajar en Facebook como su empleado más joven, y creando nuevas funciones operativas que cautivaron al mismo Mark Zuckerberg. A lo largo de su trayectoria, se enfrenta con retos y preguntas existenciales que le llevan no solo a alcanzar exitosamente otras metas profesionales, sino también a descubrir su orientación sexual y a aceptar, con el apoyo de su familia, que es gay.

The Inheritance of Orquídea Divina: A Novel

by Córdova, Zoraida

The Montoyas are used to a life without explanations. They know better than to ask why the pantry never seems to run low, or why their matriarch won't ever leave their home in Four Rivers--not for graduations, weddings, or baptisms. But when Orquídea Divina invites them to her funeral and to collect their inheritance, they hope to learn the secrets that she has held onto so tightly their whole lives. Instead, Orquídea is transformed into a ceiba tree, leaving them with more questions than answers.

Seven years later, her gifts have manifested in different ways for Marimar, Rey, and Rhiannon, granting them unexpected blessings and powers. But soon, a hidden figure begins to tear through their family tree, picking them off one by one as it seeks to destroy Orquídea's line. Determined to save what's left of their family and uncover the truth behind their inheritance, her descendants travel to Ecuador--to the place where Orquídea buried her secrets and broken promises and never looked back.

The Hacienda

by Cañas, Isabel

During the overthrow of the Mexican government, Beatriz's father was executed and her home destroyed. When handsome Don Rodolfo Solórzano proposes, Beatriz ignores the rumors surrounding his first wife's sudden demise, choosing instead to seize the security that his estate in the countryside provides. She will have her own home again, no matter the cost.

Santa Evita

by Martínez, Tomás Eloy

Diosa, reina, señora, madre, benefactora, árbitro de la moda y modelo nacional de comportamiento. Santa Evita para unos y para otros una analfabeta resentida, trepadora, loca y ordinaria, presidenta de una dictadura de mendigos. El protagonista de esta novela es el cuerpo de Eva Duarte de Perón, una belleza en vida y una hermosura etérea de 1,25 m después del trabajo del embalsamador español Pedro Ara. Un cuerpo del que se hicieron varias copias y que, en su enloquecedor viaje por el mundo durante dieciséis años, trastorna a cuantos se le acercan y se confunde con un pueblo a la deriva que no ha perdido la esperanza de su regreso.

Poeta Chileno

by Zambra, Alejandro

Alejandro Zambra returns with a beautiful, but seriously funny, declaration of love to poetry. Gonzalo is a step poet who wants to be a poet, and a stepfather. He behaves as if he were Vicente's biological father, a child who later refuses to study at a university because his dream is to -also- become a poet.

Mi lenguaje roto : memorias

by Hudes, Quiara Alegría

Quiara Alegría Hudes era la niña de ojos penetrantes que permanecía resguardada en las escaleras de la casa de su abuela en el norte de Filadelfia mientras observaba a su familia bailar en su estrecha cocina. Le maravillaban sus tías, tíos y primos, pero vivía aterrada por los secretos de la familia y las historias ocultas del barrio--todo esto mientras intentaba encontrar su propia voz entre el mar de lenguajes que la rodeaban, tanto en el habla como por escrito: inglés y español, cuerpos y libros, arte occidental y altares sagrados. Su familia se convirtió en su panteón privado, un círculo de poderosas mujeres parecidas a orishas con trágicas heridas del mundo real, y se comprometió a contar sus historias, pero primero tendría que bajarse de las escaleras y unirse al baile. Tendría que encontrar su propio lenguaje.

Finding Latinx: In Search of the Voices Redefining Latino Identity

by Ramos, Paola

Latinos are the youngest demographic in the country, with an estimated 32.5 million millennials and Gen Zers across the country. Ten out of six Latinos are millennials or younger and, every single year, one million Latinos turn eighteen. Latin-X- How a New Movement is Changing the Country will take millions of young Latinos-including the author herself-on a journey of self-discovery and empowerment, shedding light on the voices that have been brewing yet overlooked for years. From Afro-Latinos to Trans-Latinos, border town Latinos to the young Cuban-Americans in Miami, this book will give life to the cryptic term 'Latin-X'.

Olga Dies Dreaming

by Gonzalez, Xochitl

Set against the backdrop of New York City in the months surrounding the most devastating hurricane in Puerto Rico's history, Xochitl Gonzalez's Olga Dies Dreaming is a story that examines political corruption, familial strife, and the very notion of the American dream--all while asking what it really means to weather a storm.

Books for Teens

Somewhere Between Bitter and Sweet

by Kemp, Laekan Zea

Penelope Prado has always dreamed of opening her own pastelería next to her father's restaurant, Nacho's Tacos. But her mom and dad have different plans--leaving Pen to choose between not disappointing her traditional Mexican American parents or following her own path. When she confesses a secret she's been keeping, her world is sent into a tailspin. But then she meets a cute new hire at Nacho's who sees through her hard exterior and asks the questions she's been too afraid to ask herself.

Xander Amaro has been searching for home since he was a little boy. For him, a job at Nacho's is an opportunity for just that--a chance at a normal life, to settle in at his abuelo's, and to find the father who left him behind. But when both the restaurant and Xander's immigrant status are threatened, he will do whatever it takes to protect his newfound family, and himself.

Together, Pen and Xander must navigate first love and discovering where they belong in order to save the place they all call home.

We Are Not from Here

by Torres Sanchez, Jenny

Pulga has his dreams. Chico has his grief. Pequeña has her pride.

And these three teens have one another. But none of them have illusions about the town they've grown up in and the dangers that surround them. Even with the love of family, threats lurk around every corner. And when those threats become all too real, the trio knows they have no choice but to run: from their country, from their families, from their beloved home.

Crossing from Guatemala through Mexico, they follow the route of La Bestia, the perilous train system that might deliver them to a better life--if they are lucky enough to survive the journey. With nothing but the bags on their backs and desperation drumming through their hearts, Pulga, Chico, and Pequeña know there is no turning back, despite the unknown that awaits them. And the darkness that seems to follow wherever they go.

In this striking portrait of lives torn apart, the plight of migrants at the U.S. southern border is brought to light through poignant, vivid storytelling. An epic journey of danger, resilience, heartache, and hope.

 

When We Make It

by Velasquez, Elisabet

Sarai is a first-generation Puerto Rican question asker who can see with clarity the truth, pain, and beauty of the world both inside and outside her Bushwick apartment. Together with her older sister, Estrella, she navigates the strain of family traumas and the systemic pressures of toxic masculinity and housing insecurity in a rapidly gentrifying Brooklyn. Sarai questions the society around her, her Boricua identity, and the life she lives with determination and an open heart, learning to celebrate herself in a way that she has long been denied.

 

Reclaim the Stars: 17 Tales Across Realms & Space

by Córdov, Zoraida

Follow princesses warring in space, haunting ghost stories in Argentina, mermaids off the coast of the Caribbean, swamps that whisper secrets, and many more realms explored and unexplored, this stunning collection of seventeen short stories breaks borders and realms to prove that stories are truly universal.

 

Someone Like Me: How One Undocumented Girl Fought for Her American Dream

by Arce, Julissa

Born in the picturesque town of Taxco, Mexico, Julissa Arce was left behind for months at a time with her two sisters, a nanny, and her grandma while her parents worked tirelessly in America in hopes of building a home and providing a better life for their children. That is, until her parents brought Julissa to Texas to live with them. From then on, Julissa secretly lived as an undocumented immigrant, went on to become a scholarship winner and an honors college graduate, and climbed the ladder to become a vice president at Goldman Sachs.

 

Living Beyond Borders: Growing up Mexican in America

by Longoria, Margarita

In this mixed-media collection of short stories, personal essays, poetry, and comics, this celebrated group of authors share the borders they have crossed, the struggles they have pushed through, and the two cultures they continue to navigate as Mexican Americans. Living Beyond Borders is at once an eye-opening, heart-wrenching, and hopeful love letter from the Mexican American community to today's young readers.

 

Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed: 15 Voices from the Latinx Diaspora

by Fennell, Saraciea J.

A Most Anticipated Book (Refinery29, HipLatina, Publishers Weekly, Latino Book Review, Elle, Al Día, and more)!Edited by The Bronx Is Reading founder Saraciea J. Fennell and featuring an all-star cast of Latinx contributors, Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed is a ground-breaking anthology that will spark dialogue and inspire hope.

 

Lobizona

by Garber, Romina

With vivid characters that take on a life of their own, beautiful details that peel back the curtain on Romina's Argentinian heritage, and cutting prose Romina Garber crafts a timely tale of identity and adventure.

With a Star in My Hand

by Engle, Margarita

In gorgeous poems of her own, Margarita Engle tells the story of this passionate young man who revolutionized world literature.

 

We Were Here

by De la Peña, Matt

From the streets of Stockton to the beaches of Venice, all the way to the Mexican border, We Were Here follows a journey of self-discovery by a boy who is trying to forgive himself in an unforgiving world.

 

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